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What are You Working On? Rick and Kjell Team Up!

We have been doing a lot lately for 100 point restoration crowd, today we are all about the guys who like to go fast with little concern for factory specs!

This is a picture of Kjell's Talladega when I delivered it to Florida on its way to be shipped to his home in Norway
This is a picture of Kjell’s Talladega when I delivered it to Florida on its way to be shipped to his home in Norway

One of my favorite types of Posts are the ones about what you guys and gals are working on in your garages. This time I have a very unique update on a project that involves a bunch of us and is truly and International Project Car. Let’s start at the beginning. Marty Burke had a black (original maroon) Talladega without and engine and transmission. I was looking for a Talladega to build into a wild resto-mod street car. I purchased the car from Marty and bought some coil overs, power rack and pinion and other parts for my project but never got started on it due to others that were taking too long. I then sold the car and parts to Team Member Kjell Rygge in Norway. His plan for the car was similar to mine but even more ambitious. He wanted to do a car more like that of Rick Stanton. He and Rick got together and Rick is now building one wild Boss 429 engine for Kjell’s Talladega. The following photos and information were provided by Rick.

Rick Stanton's Boss 429 Talladega Benny Parson's tribute car.
Rick Stanton’s Boss 429 Talladega Benny Parson’s tribute car.

Rick says Kjell wants all real vintage Nascar Boss 429 pieces if possible. Rick is furnishing: Nascar Block, Nascar Rods, Can Am 494 Crank that he is stroking to 4.25 stroke as well as
a complete Nascar Dry Sump System, and Nascar Spyder Intake. He just last week ordered the Custom Pistons for it. The Nascar Block is .400 thick so he is boring it .200 over. It will be 4.560; the engine size will be 555 cu.in. and should should easily make 750 HP plus.

Boss 429 Heads, Intake, Valve Covers with Dominator W Choke Horns
Boss 429 Heads, Intake, Valve Covers with Dominator W Choke Horns

Boss 429 HP Block
Boss 429 HP Block
Nascar Rods
Nascar Rods
Boss 429 Crank
Boss 429 Crank

 

To explain what these additional pictures are:

Boss-429-NascarDry-Sump-Dampner
Boss-429-NascarDry-Sump-Dampner

On the Dry Sump Dampener you can see where the Gilmer Drive Belt runs off of the back of the Dampener to drive the pulley that will be on the front shaft of the Dry Sump Pan which is 2 pieces bolted together, the pans can be in all Aluminum or all Magnesium.

Nascar Dry Sump Oil Pump

Dry Sump Pan
Dry Sump Pan

Picture Boss 429 Head shows after the Heads were Ported, Stainless Steel Intake Valve size is 2.400 that Flow 425 cfm @.650 lift @ 28″, the Stainless Steel Exhaust Valve size is 1.94 that Flow 278 cfm @ .650 Lift @ 28″.

Boss 429 Head
Boss 429 Head

These heads flow enough air to support 873.8 HP.
The Nascar Spyder Intake was ported and sandblasted and now flows enough Air ( cfm) to support the heads. As a reference, the stock Boss 429 heads only flow 342.7 cfm @ .650 lift on the Intake and the Exhaust flow 249 cfm @ .650 lift. The picture (Powder Coated Semi Gloss Smooth) is the Dry Sump Belt Cover that bolts to the front of the Dry Sump Pan to protect the Belt and Pulley, Rick had 4 of these made as they are impossible to find.

Cover
Dry Sump Belt Cover

A little info on how the Dry Sump works:

There is a gear on the back of the Dampener that turns the pulley on the front of the Dry Sump pan (see Dry Sump Pan picture).
There are two Scavenge oil pickups in the pan, one in the front and one in back, the Scavenge Pump in the front of the pan draws the oil out of the pan and pumps it into the Dry Sump tank, the tank is usually about 5 gallons of oil.
The Oil in the Dry Sump tank has a series of baffles (plates with holes in them to de-aerate the oil), the oil is sucked out of the bottom of the Dry Sump tank by the Nascar Oil Pump mounted in the normal place where a wet sump 429 oil pump is mounted, then the oil flows thru an Oil Filter and a Oil Cooler then back to the Engine to pressurize it.
Normal Dry Sump systems have 100 PSI of pressure at 7,000 rpm’s controlled by a bypass spring installed into the Nascar Oil Pump.
This Dry Sump System is referred to as a Three Stage System, Two Scavenge and One Pressure, today’s Nascar Dry Sump Systems are usually 5 stages, four Scavenge and one Pressure.

 Boss-429-Polished-Rockers-bottom

Boss-429-Polished-Rockers-bottom
Boss-429-Holman-Moody-Plaques-on-Valve-Covers
Boss-429-Holman-Moody-Plaques-on-Valve-Covers

 

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Richard

Some of my first and strongest memories from my childhood relate to cars. I still remember when things happened based on what car I was driving at the time. I grew up and lived in Iowa for nearly 40 years before moving to Southern California and now live in Tennessee. I was a Corvette fanatic for years but then re-discovered vintage American Muscle. My wife, Katrina, and I decided we wanted to focus on unique and rare muscle cars. After a lot of research we fell in love with the Ford Blue Oval Aero Cars. These were only built in 1969 and and aerodynamics became an important part of winning races. The only purpose of these limited production cars was to win NASCAR races using the Boss 429 and 427 power plants complimented with a special, wind cheating, aerodynamic body. The Ford Talladega and Mercury Cyclone Spoiler II are terrific and historic cars. This site is devoted to these car and their owners past and present. We provide an Online Registry for recording the long term history and ownership of every remaining Talladega, Spoiler and Spoiler II.

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3 Comments

  1. Wow what an awesome project! This car is going to be way cool. Keep us up on the progress. Best of luck!

    Marty

  2. Talladega’s…Spoiler II’s plus many other Muscle cars are neat to view and talk about……but this is clear going to be another piece of Art in the Muscle car world !

  3. Hi Richard,
    as always you did and excellent job in writing this article.
    Can’t wait for Talladega Reunion in October.
    thanks
    Rick Stanton

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